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Showing 5 results for Ginger

Arash Khaki, Fatemeh Fathiazad, Mohammad Nouri, Amir Afshin Khaki, Chelar C Ozanci, Marefat Ghafari-Novin, Mohammad Hamadeh,
Volume 7, Issue 1 (7-2009)
Abstract

Background: Ginger rhizome (Zingiber officinale R., family: Zingiberaceae) is used medicinally and as a culinary spice.
Objective: Medicinal use of ginger dates back to ancient China and India. Ginger and its constituents are stated to have antiemetic, antithrombotic, antihepatotoxic, anti-inflammatory, stimulant, cholagogue and antioxidant. It has been used since ancient time as medicinal and food origins it contain antioxidative and androgenic activities and have well effect in diseases treatment in more countries world-wide. As an antioxidant’s ginger has a useful effect on spermatogenesis and sperm parameters.
Materials and Methods: Wistar male rat (n=30) were allocated into three groups, control (n=10) and test groups (n=20), that subdivided into groups of 2 that received ginger rhizome powder (50 and 100mg/kg/day) for 20 consequence day. Animals were kept in standard conditions. In twentieth day the testes tissue of Rats in whole groups were removed and sperm was collected from epididymis and prepared for analysis.
Results: Serum total testosterones significantly increased in experimental group that has received 100 mg/kg/day Ginger (p<0.05) in comparison to control group. Besides, the percentage of sperm viability and motility in both test groups significantly increased (p<0.05) in comparison to control group, Whereas, LH, FSH hormones, sperm concentration, morphology and testes weights in both experimental and control group were similar.
Conclusion: Results revealed that administration of 100 mg/kg/day of ginger significantly increased sperm percentage, viability, motility and serum total testosterones. This suggested that ginger may be promising in enhancing sperm healthy parameters.
Hossein Bordbar, Tahereh Esmaeilpour, Farzaneh Dehghani, Mohammad Reza Panjehshahin,
Volume 11, Issue 6 (9-2013)
Abstract

Background: In traditional medicine zingiber officinale used to regulate female menstural cycle and treat male infertility. Recent studies have suggested the possible role of ginger extract in improving the testicular damage of busulfan.
Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of zingiber officinale on the sperm parameters, testosterone level and the volume of the testes and seminiferous tubules by stereological methods.
Materials and Methods: Fifty rats were divided into four groups. All the rats were given a single intraperitoneally injection of 5mg/kg busulfan solution. The first group was kept as busulfan control, while the other groups were orally administrated ginger extract in graded doses of 50, 100 and 150mg/kg b.wt, for 48 consecutive days. At the end, all animals were anesthetized and their testes and vas deference were removed, fixed, embedded, and stained. The volume of testes and seminiferous tubules were estimated by cavalieri methods.
Results: The result showed, that zingiber officinale increased the volumes of seminiferous tubule in 100mg/kg treated group compared to control group. Sperm count (706×105 and 682×105) and the level of testosterone (50.90 ng/mL and 54.10 ng/mL) enhanced in 100 mg/kg and 150 mg/kg treated groups compared to control group (p=0.00).
Conclusion: It seems that zingiber officinale stimulate male reproductive system in induce busulfan infertility.
Jalil Hosseini, Azar Mardi Mamaghani, Hani Hosseinifar, Mohammad Ali Sadighi Gilani, Farid Dadkhah, Mahdi Sepidarkish,
Volume 14, Issue 8 (8-2016)
Abstract

Background: Although the effectiveness of ginger as an antioxidant agent has been exploited, little human research has been conducted on its activity on male reproductive functions.
Objective: This study was designed to investigate the effects of ginger (Zingiber officinale) on sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) in infertile men.
Materials and Methods: This randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with a 1:1 allocation was performed on 100 infertility treatment candidates who were admitted to Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, Tehran, Iran. Patients were randomly assigned to receive one of two treatments: ginger and placebo. Patients were given a 3-month oral treatment (members received capsules containing 250 mg of ginger powder twice a day in ginger and a placebo in other group). Before and after treatment, standardized semen samples were obtained to determine sperm concentration, motility, and SDF according to World Health Organization.
Results: There was no significant difference between two groups regarding SDF at baseline (53.48. 95%CI: 37.95-69.02) in cases and (56.75, 95%CI: 40.01-73.5) in controls. The average positive percentage of SDF in patients receiving ginger (17.77, 95%CI: 6.16-29.39) was lower compared with placebo (40.54, 95%CI: 23.94-57.13) after three month of treatment (p=0.02). In multivariate analysis, SDF was significantly lower in patients receiving ginger compared with placebo (mean difference: 3.21, 95%CI: 0.78-5.63, p=0.009). There were no significant differences between two groups regarding to semen parameters.
Conclusion: The present study has demonstrated that ginger in a controlled study of efficacy was effective in decreasing SDF in infertile men.
Mohsen Arbabi, Mahdi Delavari, Zohre Fakhrieh Kashan, Mohsen Taghizadeh, Hossein Hooshyar,
Volume 14, Issue 11 (11-2016)
Abstract

Background: Trichomoniasis is the most common sexually transmitted protozoan diseases in the worldwide. Metronidazole is the choice drug for trichomoniasis treatment, however, metronidazole resistant Trichomonas vaginalis (T.vaginalis) has been reported. Natural products are the source of most new drugs, and Zingiber officinale (Ginger) is widely used ingredient in the traditional medicine.
Objective: The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of different concentrations of the ginger ethanol extract on the growth of T.vaginalis trophozoites in vitro.
Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 970 women who were attend in Kashan health centers were examined for T. vaginalis. Of them, 23 samples were infected with T.vaginalis. Three T. vaginalis isolates were cultured in a TYI-S-33 medium. The effect of ginger ethanol extracts and its toxicity in different concentrations (25, 50, 100, 200, 400, 800 μg/ml) on mouse macrophages were measured in triplicate exam by MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay. The effect of ginger on apoptosis induction was determined by Flow cytometry.
Results: The IC50 of ginger and metronidazole were 93.8 and 0.0326 μg/ml, respectively. 12, 24 and 48 hr after adding different concentrations of extract on mouse macrophages, fatality rates in maximum dose (800 μg/ml) were 0.19, 0.26 and 0.31 respectively. Flow cytometry results showed the apoptosis rate following treatment with different concentrations of the extract after 48 hr were 17, 28.5, 42.1, 58.8, 76.3 and 100% respectively, while in the control group was 2.9%.
Conclusion: Ginger ethanol extract induces programmed death in T. vaginalis. It is recommended that due to the known teratogenic effect of metronidazole, ginger can be considered as an alternative drug for metronidazole.
Shekoufeh Atashpour, Hossein Kargar Jahromi, Zahra Kargar Jahromi, Mozhgan Maleknasab,
Volume 15, Issue 9 (9-2017)
Abstract

Background: Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in women which affect fertility. Clomiphene citrate is used as first-line treatment for this disorder, which is associated with some complications and therapeutic resistance.
Objective: In this research, we compare the effectiveness of ginger with clomiphene on sexual hormones such as Luteinizing hormone (LH), Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), estrogen and progesterone in order to treat PCOS effectively with fewer side effects.
Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 63 adult female rats (170-200 gr) were studied and divided randomly into 9 groups as control (not received any interventional substance for 60 and 89 days), sham (were given distilled water and ethyl alcohol intraperitoneally daily for 60 and 89 days), and 7 experimental groups receiving estradiol valerate (PCOS inducing agent, intramuscular) alone and with 100 mg/kg clomiphene or different doses of ginger extract (175 and 350 mg/kg) orally daily for 60 and 89 days. Sexual hormones were analyzed and compared in different groups.
Results: Our results showed that in the PCOS-induced group, LH and estrogen concentration increased while progesterone and FSH concentration decreased remarkably (p<0.05) as compared to control group. Furthermore, in groups receiving clomiphene and ginger extract, we demonstrated significant (p<0.05) improvement in hormonal secretion as compared to the PCOS-induced group. Clomiphene, compared with the lower dose of ginger extract, had a better improving effect on balancing sexual hormones in PCOS. Moreover, ginger extract at higher doses has better effects in improving PCOS.
Conclusion: As the long-term administration of clomiphene citrate has some side effects, the use of ginger as a herbal medicine without any side effects at high doses can be an effective and good alternative in improving PCOS.
zingiber officinal R. on primary dysmenorrhea. J Med Plants 2010; 9: 81-86.

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