Search published articles


Showing 2 results for Sepidarkish

Jalil Hosseini, Azar Mardi Mamaghani, Hani Hosseinifar, Mohammad Ali Sadighi Gilani, Farid Dadkhah, Mahdi Sepidarkish,
Volume 14, Issue 8 (8-2016)
Abstract

Background: Although the effectiveness of ginger as an antioxidant agent has been exploited, little human research has been conducted on its activity on male reproductive functions.
Objective: This study was designed to investigate the effects of ginger (Zingiber officinale) on sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) in infertile men.
Materials and Methods: This randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with a 1:1 allocation was performed on 100 infertility treatment candidates who were admitted to Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, Tehran, Iran. Patients were randomly assigned to receive one of two treatments: ginger and placebo. Patients were given a 3-month oral treatment (members received capsules containing 250 mg of ginger powder twice a day in ginger and a placebo in other group). Before and after treatment, standardized semen samples were obtained to determine sperm concentration, motility, and SDF according to World Health Organization.
Results: There was no significant difference between two groups regarding SDF at baseline (53.48. 95%CI: 37.95-69.02) in cases and (56.75, 95%CI: 40.01-73.5) in controls. The average positive percentage of SDF in patients receiving ginger (17.77, 95%CI: 6.16-29.39) was lower compared with placebo (40.54, 95%CI: 23.94-57.13) after three month of treatment (p=0.02). In multivariate analysis, SDF was significantly lower in patients receiving ginger compared with placebo (mean difference: 3.21, 95%CI: 0.78-5.63, p=0.009). There were no significant differences between two groups regarding to semen parameters.
Conclusion: The present study has demonstrated that ginger in a controlled study of efficacy was effective in decreasing SDF in infertile men.
Reza Omani Samani , Amir Almasi Hashiani, Maryam Razavi, Samira Vesali, Mahroo Rezaeinejad, Saman Maroufizadeh, Mahdi Sepidarkish,
Volume 16, Issue 11 (November 2018)
Abstract

Background: Understanding the prevalence of menstrual disorders has important implications for both health service planning and risk factor epidemiology.
Objective: The aim of this review is to identify and collate studies describing the prevalence of menstrual disorders in Iran.
Materials and Methods: Studies with original data related to the prevalence of menstrual disorders were identified via searching six electronic databases and reviewing citations. All abstracts or titles found by the electronic searches were independently scrutinized by two reviewers. The Meta-analysis was performed with a random effects model, considering the remarkable heterogeneity among studies. A total of 35 eligible epidemiological studies were included in this review.
Results: Overall, the pooled prevalence of primary dysmenorrhea was 73.27% (95% CI=65.12-81.42). The mean proportion of women with oligomenorrhea was 13.11% (95.5%, 95% CI: 10.04-16.19). We identified 16 studies that reported polymenorrhoea with a random effect of pooled prevalence estimate of 9.94% (95% CI 7.33%-12.56%). The prevalence estimate of hypermenorrhea was 12.94% (95% CI 9.31%-16.57%). Overall prevalence of hypomenorrhea was 5.25% (95% CI 3.20%-7.30%), ranging from 0.9- 12.90%. Pooling six studies that reported estimates for menorrhagia, the overall prevalence was 19.24% (95% CI 12.78-25.69). Overall, 6.04% (95% CI: 1.99-10.08) of the women were shown to have metrorrhagia.
Conclusion: This systematic review suggests that the average prevalence of menstrual disorders in Iran is substantial. It has been neglected as a fundamental problem of womenchr('39')s reproductive health. Diagnosis and treatment of these disorders should be included in the primary health care system of reproductive health.
 


Page 1 from 1     

© 2021 CC BY-NC 4.0 | International Journal of Reproductive BioMedicine

Designed & Developed by : Yektaweb