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Zahra Karimian, Effat Merghati Khoei, Raziyeh Maasoumi, Marzieh Araban, Mahbube Rasolzade, Shahrokh Aghayan, Seied Ali Azin,
Volume 15, Issue 4 (6-2017)
Abstract

Background: Iranian sexology researchers have emphasized the need for highquality scientific data on the dimensions of sexuality among adults, particularly withcultural considerations. Best practice and the delivery of sexual health services relyon rigorous facts extracted from surveys, but often those facts cannot be availabledue to the lack of culturally-sensitive questionnaires.
Objective: The aim of this study was to show the validity and reliability of thePersian version of the Acquisition of Sexual Information Test (ASIT), a measureselected due to its assemblages with Iranian culture.
Materials and Methods: Forward-backward procedure was applied to translate the50 items-Acquisition of Sexual Information Test from English into Persian. Afterlinguistic validation, a cross-sectional study was carried out and psychometricproperties of the Iranian version of five-dimension questionnaire were tested in athirty sample of reproductive-age, married, healthy and sexually active women. Facevalidity was assessed by qualitative and quantitative methods. Content validity wasalso assessed by calculating two quantitative indicators as content validity index(CVI) and content validity ratio (CVR). In the qualitative phase, experts assessed thequestionnaire from aspects such as wording, grammar, item allocation, and scaling.Reliability was assessed by test-retest analyses.
Results: Impact score was 1.5 in all questions. , the majority of participants (83.3%)stated that the overall level of content qualitative validity of the questionnaire for thetarget population was high but some of the questions were irrelevant to sexualknowledge such as questions in regard to sexual self-concept and human evolution.Many questions (90%) gained a CVR less than 0.56, and all of them gained CVIslower than 0.7. Correlation in test-retest reliability was 0.85 that was considered tobe acceptable.
Conclusion: Regardless of our initial assumptions about selecting the Acquisition ofSexual Information Test, the Persian version of sexual knowledge questionnaireseems to be culturally inappropriate for Iranian women. Although, we need surveydata for assessing the evidence-based needs for sexual health and best practice, butthe questions addressing various dimensions of sexuality such as knowledge must beculturally sensitive, comprehensive and appropriate. Our findings suggest that ASITas a well-known measure should be used in Iranian population with caution. It mustbe re-validated in different adult populations than that we selected in this study.
Alamtaj Samsami, Leila Ghasempour, Sara Davoodi, Shaghayegh Moradi Alamdarloo, Jamshid Rahmati, Ali Karimian, Hamide Homayoon,
Volume 17, Issue 12 (December 2019)
Abstract

Background: The endometrial preparation with stimulating natural cycles for frozen embryo transfer (FET) have benefits like lower cost and ease of use.
Objective: Comparing the clinical outcome of letrozole versus hormone replacement (HR) for endometrial preparation in women with normal menstrual cycles for FET in artificial reproduction techniques.
Materials and Methods: A total of 167 participants who had frozen embryos and regular ovulatory cycles were randomly divided into two groups for endometrial preparation. One group (82 women) was stimulated with letrozole 5mg/day and the other group (85 women) was hormonally stimulated by oral estradiol valerate (2 mg three times a day). All participants were followed serially by ultrasonography. Any patient who did not reach optimal endometrial thickness was excluded from the study. Implantation, biochemical and clinical pregnancy and abortion rate were reported.
Results: There was no significant difference in the mean age, duration, and primary or secondary infertility, cause of the infertility, number, and quality of transferred embryos between the groups. The mean estradiol level on the day of transfer was 643 ± 217 in the HR group and 547 ± 212 in the letrozole group (P = 0.01), which was significantly different. The clinical pregnancy rate was 38.7 in the letrozole group, higher than the HR group (25.3) but not significantly different (P=0.06).
Conclusion: For endometrial preparation in women with a normal cycle, letrozole yields higher pregnancy rate although it is not significant; due to its cost, ease in use, and lower side effects, letrozole is a good choice.

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