Search published articles


Showing 4 results for Dolati

Tahereh Khosrorad, Mahrokh Dolatian, Hedyeh Riazi, Zohreh Mahmoodi, Hamid Alavimajd, Soodeh Shahsavari, Mitra Bakhtiari,
Volume 13, Issue 9 (10-2015)
Abstract

Background: Infertility is a major reproductive health in gynecology. According to the world health organization, there are currently 50-80 million infertile couples in the world.
Objective: Considering the critical effects of lifestyle on reproductive health, this study aimed to compare the lifestyle of fertile and infertile couples in Kermanshah during 2013.
Materials and Methods: This research is a descriptive cross sectional study that was done on 216 fertile and infertile couples attending Infertility Center and six medical centers that were selected through the convenience sampling. Data were collected using a researcher-made questionnaire containing demographic and fertility-related information and also lifestyle items on nutrition, physical activity, perceived social support, responsibility for health, and inappropriate health behaviors. Descriptive statistics, logistic regression analysis, independent t, chi-square and  Generalized Estimating equation were performed to analyze the data.
Results: Fertile and infertile women (86.1% and 73. 1% respectively, p= 0. 03) as well as fertile and infertile men were significantly different in terms of physical activity (87% and 96.3% p<0.001, respectively) and perceived social support (p<0.001). Moreover, there was a significant difference between fertile and infertile women in nutrition (p<0.001). Similar differences were observed in responsibility for health and inappropriate health behaviors between fertile and infertile men. However, all of the dimensions of lifestyle, except nutrition, were significantly different between fertile and infertile couples.
Conclusion: As lifestyle plays a crucial role in reproductive health, the inappropriate lifestyle of infertile couples has to be modified through effective measures such as awareness promotion, behavioral changes, and development of a healthy environment.

Mahmoud Nateghi Rostam, Batool Hossein Rashidi, Azam Habibi, Razieh Nazari, Masoumeh Dolati,
Volume 15, Issue 6 (7-2017)
Abstract

Background: Trichomonas vaginalis (T.vaginalis) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (N.gonorrhoeae) are two most common non-viral sexually transmitted infections in the world. No data are available regarding the epidemiology of genital infections in women of Qom, central Iran.
Objective: Epidemiological investigation of sexually transmitted infections in genital specimens of women referred to the referral gynecology hospital in Qom, central Iran.
Materials and Methods: Genital swab specimens were collected from women volunteers and used for identification of bacterial and protozoal infections by conventional microbial diagnostics, porA pseudo gene LightCycler® real-time PCR (for N.gonorrhoeae) and ITS-PCR (for T.vaginalis).
Results: Of 420 volunteers, 277 (65.9%) had genital signs/symptoms, including 38.3% malodorous discharge, 37.9% dyspareunia, and 54.8% abdominal pain. Totally, 2 isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae were identified. Five specimens (1.2%) in Thayer-Martin culture and 17 (4.1%) in real-time PCR were identified as N.gonorrhoeae. Fifty-four specimens (12.9%) in wet mount, 64 (15.2%) in Dorset’s culture, and 81 (19.3%) in ITS-PCR showed positive results for T.vaginalis. Five mixed infections of T.vaginalis+ N.gonorrhoeae were found. The risk of T.vaginalis infection was increased in women with low-birth-weight (p=0.00; OR=43.29), history of abortion (p=0.00; OR=91.84), and premature rupture of membranes (PROM) (p=0.00; OR=21.75). The probability of finding nuclear leukocytes (p=0.00; OR=43.34) in vaginal smear was higher in T.vaginalis infection.
Conclusion: The significant prevalence of trichomoniasis and gonorrhea emphasizes the need for accurate diagnosis and effective surveillance to prevent serious reproductive complications in women.
Mahrokh Dolatian, Nasibeh Sharifi, Zohreh Mahmoodi,
Volume 16, Issue 9 (September 2018)
Abstract

Background: Premature birth is the main cause of neonatal mortality and long-term complications, which imposes heavy financial and psychological burdens on the family and society; therefore, it is important to recognize the factors affecting it.
Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between socioeconomic status, psychosocial factors, and food insecurity with preterm delivery.
Materials and Methods: This longitudinal study was conducted on 674 pregnant women at 24-28 wk of gestation who met the inclusion criteria. The subjects were selected using cluster sampling. The pregnant women filled out total questionnaires of study and they followed up until delivery and the data about the newborn was collected after delivery. The data collection tools included questionnaires for evaluating socioeconomic status, psychosocial factors, and food insecurity.
Results: The prevalence of preterm delivery was 7.7%, and socioeconomic factors were not associated with preterm labor. Among the intermediary factors, social health, food insecurity, stress, and prenatal care had a significant relationship with preterm labor. The prevalence rates of preterm delivery in cases with food insecurity, stress, and inadequate prenatal care were 2, 9.1 and 13.2 times higher than those who had food security, did not experience stress, and received adequate care during pregnancy.
Conclusion: Preterm labor is a relatively common problem in which intermediary social determinants of health can play an important role. Considering the limited studies on this issue, the results of this study can lay the foundation for future studies.
Farnaz Mohammadzadeh, Mahrokh Dolatian, Masoumeh Jorjani, Maryam Afrakhteh, Hamid Alavi Majd, Fatemeh Abdi, Reza Pakzad,
Volume 17, Issue 9 (September 2019)
Abstract

Abstract
Background: Chlamydia Trachomatis is one of the most common pathogens transmitted through the genital tract in humans that leads to urogenital infection. 
Objective: Given the high prevalence of chlamydia infection and its adverse effects on the health of women and men, the present meta-analysis was conducted to determine the rate of treatment failure with azithromycin.
Materials and Methods: Databases including MEDLINE, ISI - Web of Science, PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, ProQuest, and Science Direct were searched for articles published between 1991 and 2018. The quality of the selected articles was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. Heterogeneity was determined using the I2 and Cochrane Q-Test. Subgroup analysis and meta-regression were used to compare the prevalence rates on different levels of the variables. 
Results: A total of 21 articles that met the inclusion criteria were ultimately assessed. The pooled estimate of azithromycin failure rate was 11.23% (CI 95%: 8.23%-14.24%). Also, the azithromycin failure rate was 15.87% (CI 95%: 10.20%-21.54%) for the treatment of urethritis, 7.41% (CI 95%: 0.60%-14.22%) for cervicitis, and 7.14% (CI 95%: 10.90%-3.39%) for genital chlamydia. The pooled estimate of failure rate difference was 2.37% (CI 95%: 0.68%-4.06%), which shows that azithromycin has a higher failure rate in the treatment of chlamydia compared to doxycycline and other examined medications. The meta-regression results showed that the patientchr('39')s age contributes significantly to the heterogeneity for azithromycin treatment failure rate (β = 0.826; p = 0.017).
Conclusion: Azithromycin has a higher failure rate than doxycycline and other studied medications in treating urogenital chlamydia infections. 

Key words: Azithromycin, Chlamydia trachomatis, Urogenital, Treatment failure, Meta-analysis. 
Abstract
Background: Chlamydia Trachomatis is one of the most common pathogens transmitted through the genital tract in humans that leads to urogenital infection. 
Objective: Given the high prevalence of chlamydia infection and its adverse effects on the health of women and men, the present meta-analysis was conducted to determine the rate of treatment failure with azithromycin.
Materials and Methods: Databases including MEDLINE, ISI - Web of Science, PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, ProQuest, and Science Direct were searched for articles published between 1991 and 2018. The quality of the selected articles was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. Heterogeneity was determined using the I2 and Cochrane Q-Test. Subgroup analysis and meta-regression were used to compare the prevalence rates on different levels of the variables. 
Results: A total of 21 articles that met the inclusion criteria were ultimately assessed. The pooled estimate of azithromycin failure rate was 11.23% (CI 95%: 8.23%-14.24%). Also, the azithromycin failure rate was 15.87% (CI 95%: 10.20%-21.54%) for the treatment of urethritis, 7.41% (CI 95%: 0.60%-14.22%) for cervicitis, and 7.14% (CI 95%: 10.90%-3.39%) for genital chlamydia. The pooled estimate of failure rate difference was 2.37% (CI 95%: 0.68%-4.06%), which shows that azithromycin has a higher failure rate in the treatment of chlamydia compared to doxycycline and other examined medications. The meta-regression results showed that the patientchr('39')s age contributes significantly to the heterogeneity for azithromycin treatment failure rate (β = 0.826; p = 0.017).
Conclusion: Azithromycin has a higher failure rate than doxycycline and other studied medications in treating urogenital chlamydia infections. 

 

Page 1 from 1     

© 2020 All Rights Reserved | International Journal of Reproductive BioMedicine

Designed & Developed by : Yektaweb