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Showing 4 results for Bakhtiari

Mitra Bakhtiari, Aligholi Sobhani, Mohammad Akbari, Parichehr Pasbakhsh, Mehdi Abbasi, Azim Hedayatpoor, Fardin Amidi , Feridoon Sargolzaei,
Volume 5, Issue 3 (7-2007)
Abstract

Background: Various approaches have been used in the attempts to improve the quality of frozen–thawed mouse sperms. According to literatures, it seems that hyaluronic acid (HA) has an important role on the permeability and motility of sperms and their interaction with gametes.
Objective: For evaluation of HA supplementation on sperm characteristics and fertilization capability, we investigated the effect of different doses of HA on mouse sperm morphology, motility, vitality and fertilization capability after freezing and thawing.
Materials and Methods: The cauda epididymes was removed from 6 male mice with aseptic method. The sperm samples were frozen in 1.8 ml cryotubes with 18% raffinose and 3% skimmed milk containing cryo-protectant solution. HA at the concentration of 750, 1000 or 1250 µg/ml was supplemented to frozen-thawed sperms. Sperm motility was measured with microscope, and fertilization rate was evaluated after routine IVF by counting the fertilized oocytes. For sperm morphology, papaniclau staining was used while; Eosin B was used for the assessment of sperm viability rate.
Results: HA supplementation (750 µg/ml) improved motility parameters (p < 0.05) and increased the fertility rate (p < 0.05). The effect of 1,000 µg/ml HA was also positive on the sperms. But 1,250 µg/ml HA had negative effect on above mentioned characteristic. On the other hand, none of these doses had any effect on sperm morphology.
Conclusion: The dose of 750 µg/ml of HA has the greatest effect on the motility, vitality and fertility rate of sperms after cryopreservation.

 
Tahereh Khosrorad, Mahrokh Dolatian, Hedyeh Riazi, Zohreh Mahmoodi, Hamid Alavimajd, Soodeh Shahsavari, Mitra Bakhtiari,
Volume 13, Issue 9 (10-2015)
Abstract

Background: Infertility is a major reproductive health in gynecology. According to the world health organization, there are currently 50-80 million infertile couples in the world.
Objective: Considering the critical effects of lifestyle on reproductive health, this study aimed to compare the lifestyle of fertile and infertile couples in Kermanshah during 2013.
Materials and Methods: This research is a descriptive cross sectional study that was done on 216 fertile and infertile couples attending Infertility Center and six medical centers that were selected through the convenience sampling. Data were collected using a researcher-made questionnaire containing demographic and fertility-related information and also lifestyle items on nutrition, physical activity, perceived social support, responsibility for health, and inappropriate health behaviors. Descriptive statistics, logistic regression analysis, independent t, chi-square and  Generalized Estimating equation were performed to analyze the data.
Results: Fertile and infertile women (86.1% and 73. 1% respectively, p= 0. 03) as well as fertile and infertile men were significantly different in terms of physical activity (87% and 96.3% p<0.001, respectively) and perceived social support (p<0.001). Moreover, there was a significant difference between fertile and infertile women in nutrition (p<0.001). Similar differences were observed in responsibility for health and inappropriate health behaviors between fertile and infertile men. However, all of the dimensions of lifestyle, except nutrition, were significantly different between fertile and infertile couples.
Conclusion: As lifestyle plays a crucial role in reproductive health, the inappropriate lifestyle of infertile couples has to be modified through effective measures such as awareness promotion, behavioral changes, and development of a healthy environment.

Nasrin Takzare, Esmaeil Samizadeh, Saeed Shoar, Masoumeh Majidi Zolbin, Mohammad Naderan, Ali Lashkari, Azam Bakhtiarian,
Volume 14, Issue 5 (5-2016)
Abstract

Background: There are numerous investigations on wide range of issues that disrupt regulatory spermatogenesis, individuals who are exposed to drug abuse faced infertility and immature spermatogenesis.
Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the addiction effects of morphine and its derivatives on rats spermatogenesis.
Materials and Methods: 40 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 equal groups, which were exposed either with intravenous morphine, naloxone, naloxone and morphine, sham (with normal saline injection) and a control group without infusion. Spermatogenesis was assessed after three months via histological sections with hematoxylin and eosin staining, using a light microscope based on measurement of spermatogonia, spermatocyte, spermatid, and spermatozoa.
Results: Those rats that received opioids had changes in spermatogenesis function. The population of spermatogenesis cycle cells at spermatogonia, spermatocyte, spermatid, and spermatozoa stages was significantly decreased in those rats that received opioid in comparison to the control group (p<0.05). Histological studies revealed that changes in different groups of opioid application might affect sperm formation. Sperm count in morphine group was (0±0) and in naloxone group, naloxone+morphine, sham and control were 235±3.77, 220±3.81, 247.12±6.10 and 250±6.54, respectively (p<0.001).
Conclusion: Morphine could affect all spermatogenesis stages.
Ensieh Shahrokh Tehrani Nejad , Fatemeh Bakhtiari Ghaleh, Bita Eslami, Fedyeh Haghollahi, Maryam Bagheri, Masoumeh Masoumi,
Volume 16, Issue 8 (August 2018)
Abstract

Background: Both oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) and estradiol valerate (E2) have been used to schedule a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles. Since the suppression of follicle-stimulating hormone by OCPs can stay 5-7 days after stopping the pills, it seems that starting the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) after 6 days of pre-treatment discontinuation may be important in IVF outcomes.
Objective: The aim of the present study was to determine the number of mature oocyte and pregnancy rate of three pretreatment methods for fresh embryo transfer cycles.
Materials and Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, two-hundred ten women (18-35 yr and less than 2 previous IVF attempts) undergoing IVF with the GnRH antagonist protocol were randomized to the OCP, E2, and no pretreatment arms. OCP group (n=53) received OCP (ethinyl estradiol30 μg and levonorgestrel150 μg), E2 group (n=63) received 4 mg/day oral E2 (17β‐E2) for 10 days from day 20 of the previous cycle and GnRH antagonist stimulation was started 6 days after the interruption of OCP and E2. The control group (n =70) did not receive any pretreatment.
Results: No significant difference was observed in the mean number of the mature oocyte, endometrial thickness, and embryo quality. The pregnancy rate in E2 group was higher than the two other groups (42.9% vs 39.6% and 34.3% in OCP and control group, respectively), but the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.59).
Conclusion: It seems OCP or E2 pretreatment could not improve the fresh IVF-embryo transfer outcomes

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