Volume 10, Issue 2 (7-2012)                   IJRM 2012, 10(2): 113-0 | Back to browse issues page

XML Persian Abstract Print


Download citation:
BibTeX | RIS | EndNote | Medlars | ProCite | Reference Manager | RefWorks
Send citation to:

Zangeneh F Z, Abdollahi A, Aminee F, Naghizadeh M M. Locus coeruleus lesions and PCOS: role of the central and peripheral sympathetic nervous system in the ovarian function of rat. IJRM. 2012; 10 (2) :113-0
URL: http://journals.ssu.ac.ir/ijrmnew/article-1-270-en.html
1- Vali-e-Asr Reproductive Health Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Iran , Zangeneh14@gmail.com
2- Vali-e-Asr Hospital, Pathology Laboratory, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Iran
3- Veterinary Faculty, Tehran University, Tehran, Iran, Iran
4- Central Biostatistics, Fasa University of Medical Sciences, Fasa, Iran, Iran
Abstract:   (106 Views)
Background: “Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex endocrine and metabolic disorder associated with ovulatory dysfunction”. “Autonomic and central nervous systems play important roles in the regulation of ovarian physiology”. The noradrenergic nucleus locus coeruleus (LC) plays a central role in the regulation of the sympathetic nervous system and synaptically connected to the preganglionic cell bodies of the ovarian sympathetic pathway and its activation is essential to trigger spontaneous or induced LH surges. This study evaluates sympathetic outflow in central and peripheral pathways in PCO rats.
Objective: Our objectives in this study were (1) to estimate LC activity in rats with estradiol valerate (EV)-induced PCO; (2) to antagonized alpha2a adrenoceptor in systemic conditions with yohimbine.
Materials and Methods: Forty two rats were divided into two groups: 1) LC and yohimbine and 2) control. Every group subdivided in two groups: eighteen rats were treated with estradiol valerate for induction of follicular cysts and the remainders were sesame oil groups.
Results: Estradiol concentration was significantly augmented by the LC lesion in PCO rats (p<0.001), while LC lesion could not alter serum concentrations of LH and FSH, like yohimbine. The morphological observations of ovaries of LC lesion rats showed follicles with hyperthecosis, but yohimbine reduced the number of cysts, increased corpus lutea and developed follicles.
Conclusion: Rats with EV-induced PCO increased sympathetic activity. LC lesion and yohimbine decreased the number of cysts and yohimbine increased corpus lutea and developed follicles in PCO rats.
Full-Text [PDF 557 kb]   (26 Downloads) |   |   Full-Text (HTML)  (2 Views)  
Type of Study: Original Article |
Received: 2017/10/1

References
1. Azziz R, Woods KS, Reyna R, Key TJ, Knochenhauer ES, Yildiz BO. The prevalence and features of the polycystic ovary syndrome in an unselected population. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2004; 89: 2745-2749. [DOI:10.1210/jc.2003-032046]
2. Norman RJ, Dewailly D, Legro RS, Hickey TE. Polycystic ovary syndrome. Lancet 2007; 370: 685-697. [DOI:10.1016/S0140-6736(07)61345-2]
3. Aguado LI. Role of the central and peripheral nervous system in the ovarian function. Microsc Res Tech 2002; 59: 462-473. [DOI:10.1002/jemt.10232]
4. Honma K, Wuttke W. Norepinephrine and dopamine turnover rates in the medial preoptic area and the mediobasal hypothalamus of the rat brain after various endocrinological manipulations. Endocrin 1980; 106: 1848-1853. [DOI:10.1210/endo-106-6-1848]
5. Rothfeld J, Hejtmancik JF, Conn PM, Pfaff DW. In situ hybridization for LHRH m RNA following estrogen treatment. Mol Brain Res 1989; 6: 121-125. [DOI:10.1016/0169-328X(89)90045-4]
6. Simonian SX, Delaleu B, CaratyA, HerbisonAE. Estrogen receptor expression in brainstem noradrenergic neurons of the sheep. Neuroendocrin 1998; 67: 392-402. [DOI:10.1159/000054338]
7. Swanson LW, Hartman BK. The central adrenergic system. A immunofluorescence study of the location of cell bodies and their efferent connections in the rat using dopamine-b-hydroxylase as a marker. J Comp Neurol 1976: 163: 467-506. [DOI:10.1002/cne.901630406]
8. Wise PM, Rance N, Selmanoff M, Barraclough CA. Changes in radio immune assayable luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in discrete brain areas of the rat at various times on proestrus, diestrous day 1 and after phenobarbital administration. Endocrin 1981; 108: 2179-2185. [DOI:10.1210/endo-108-6-2179]
9. Stener-Victorin E, Jedel E, Manneras L. Acupuncture in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Current Experimental and Clinical Evidence. J Neuroendocrinol 2008; 20: 290-298. [DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2826.2007.01634.x]
10. Fagius J. Sympathetic nerve activity in metabolic control-some basic concepts. Acta Physiol Scand 2003; 177: 337-343. [DOI:10.1046/j.1365-201X.2003.01086.x]
11. Hoffman LK, Ehrmann DA. Cardiometabolic features of polycystic ovary syndrome. Nat Clin Pract Endocrinol Metab 2008; 4: 215-222. [DOI:10.1038/ncpendmet0755]
12. Solomon CG. The epidemiology of polycystic ovary syndrome. Prevalence and associated disease risks. Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am 1999; 28: 247-263. [DOI:10.1016/S0889-8529(05)70069-4]
13. Nelson VL, Qin KN, Rosenfield RL, Wood JR, Penning TM, Legro RS. The biochemical basis for increased testosterone production in theca cells propagated from patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2001; 86: 5925-5933. [DOI:10.1210/jcem.86.12.8088]
14. Sverrisdóttir YB, Mogren T, Kataoka J, Janson PO, Stener-Victorin E. Is polycystic ovary syndrome associated with high sympathetic nerve activity and size at birth? Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 2008; 294: 576-581. [DOI:10.1152/ajpendo.00725.2007]
15. Berridge CW, Waterhouse BD. The locus coeruleus-noradrenergic system: modulation of behavioral state and state-dependent cognitive processess. Brain Res Rev 2003; 42: 33-84. [DOI:10.1016/S0165-0173(03)00143-7]
16. Kvetnansky R, Bodnar I, Shahar T, Uhereczky G, Krizanova O, Mravec B. Effect of lesion of A5 and A7 brainstem noradrenergic areas or transaction of brainstem pathways on sympathoadrenal activity in rats during immobilization stress. Neurochem Res 2006; 31: 267-275. [DOI:10.1007/s11064-005-9016-4]
17. Sved AF, Cano G, Card JP. Neuroanatomical specificity of the circuits controlling sympathetic outflow to different targets. Clin Exp Pharmacol 2001; 28: 115-119. [DOI:10.1046/j.1440-1681.2001.03403.x]
18. Bernuci MP, Szawka RE, Helena CV, Leite CM, Lara HE, Anselmo-Franci JA. Anselmo-Franci. Locus Coeruleus Mediates Cold Stress-Induced. Polycystic Ovary in Rats. Endocrin 2008; 149: 2907-2916. [DOI:10.1210/en.2007-1254]
19. Anselmo-Franci JA, Franci CR, Krulich L, Antunes-Rodrigues J, McCann SM. Locus coeruleus lesions decrease norepinephrine input into the medial preoptic area and medial basal hypothalamus and block the LH, FSH and prolactin preovulatory surge. Brain Res 1997; 767: 289-296. [DOI:10.1016/S0006-8993(97)00613-6]
20. Vega Helena CV, Franci CR, Anselmo-Franci JA. Luteinizing hormone and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone secretion is under locus coeruleus control in female rats. Brain Res 2002; 955: 245-252. [DOI:10.1016/S0006-8993(02)03471-6]
21. Barria A, Leyton V, Ojeda SR, Lara HE. Ovarian steroidal response to gonadotropins and beta-adrenergic stimulation is enhanced in polycystic ovary syndrome: role of sympathetic innervation. Endocrinology 1993; 133: 2696-2703. [DOI:10.1210/endo.133.6.8243293]
22. Lara HE, Ferruz JL, Luza S, Bustamante DA, Borges Y, Ojeda SR. Activation of ovarian sympathetic nerves in polycystic ovary syndrome. Endocrinology 1993; 133: 2690-2695. [DOI:10.1210/endo.133.6.7902268]
23. Szukiewicz D, Uilenbro M. Polycystic ovary syndrome-searching for an animal model. J Med 1998; 29: 259-275.
24. Brawer JR, Munoz M. Development of the polycystic ovarian conditions (PCO) in the estradiol valerate-treated rat. Biol Reprod 1996; 35: 647-655. [DOI:10.1095/biolreprod35.3.647]
25. Riickert N, Bubser M, Schmidt WJ. 6-Hydroxydopamine lesion of locus coeruleus and the antiparkinsonian potential of NMDA-receptor antagonists in rats. J Neural Transm 1997; 104: 363- 377. [DOI:10.1007/BF01277657]
26. Serova L, Rivkin M, Nakashima A, Sabban EL. Estradiol stimulates gene expression of norepinephrine biosynthetic enzymes in rat locus coeruleus. Neuroendocrinology 2002; 75: 193-200. [DOI:10.1159/000048237]
27. Pendergast JS, Tuesta LM, Bethea JR. Oestrogen receptor beta contributes to the transient sex difference in tyrosine hydroxylase expression in the mouse locus coeruleus. J Neuroendocrinol 2008; 20: 1155-1164. [DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2826.2008.01776.x]
28. Wright DE, Jennes L. Origin of noradrenergic projections to GnRH perikarya-containing areas in the medial septum-diagonal band and preoptic area. Brain Res 1993; 621: 272-278. [DOI:10.1016/0006-8993(93)90116-5]
29. Anselmo-Franci JA, Franci CR, Krulich L, Antunes-Rodrigues J, McCann SM. Locus coeruleus lesions decrease norepinephrine input into the medial preoptic area and medial basal hypothalamus and block the LH, FSH and prolactin preovulatory surge. Brain Res 1997; 767: 289-296. [DOI:10.1016/S0006-8993(97)00613-6]
30. Helena CV, Franci CR, Anselmo-Franci JA. Luteinizing hormone and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone secretion is under locus coeruleus control in female rats. Brain Res 2002; 955: 245-252. [DOI:10.1016/S0006-8993(02)03471-6]
31. Gallo RV, Drouva SV. Effect of intraventricular infusion of catecholamines on luteinizing hormone release in ovariectomized and ovariectomized, steroid-primed rats. Neuroendocrinology 1979; 29:149-162. [DOI:10.1159/000122917]
32. Leipheimer RE, Gallo RV. Medial preoptic area involvement in norepinephrine-induced suppression of pulsatile luteinizing hormone release in ovariectomized rats. Neuroendocrinology 1985; 40: 345-351. [DOI:10.1159/000124097]
33. Clifton DK, Steiner RA. Recovery of pulsatile luteinizing hormone secretion following permanent disruption of the ascending noradrenergic fiber tract in the ovariectomized rat. Biol Reprod 1985; 33: 808-814. [DOI:10.1095/biolreprod33.4.808]
34. Anselmo-Franci JA, Rocha-Barros VM, Franci CR, McCann SM. Locus ceruleus lesions block pulsatile LH release in ovariectomized rats. Brain Res 1999; 833: 86-92. [DOI:10.1016/S0006-8993(99)01548-6]
35. Dissen GA, Garcia-Rudaz C, Ojeda SR. Role of neurotrophic factors in early ovarian development. Semin Reprod Med 2009; 27: 24-31. [DOI:10.1055/s-0028-1108007]
36. Barria A, Leyton V, Ojeda SR, Lara HE. Ovarian steroidal response to gonadotropins and beta-adrenergic stimulation is enhanced in polycystic ovary syndrome: role of sympathetic innervation. Endocrinology 1993; 133: 2696-2703. [DOI:10.1210/endo.133.6.8243293]
37. Manni L, Lundeberg T, Holmang A, Aloe L, Stener-Victorin E. Effect of electro-acupuncture on ovarian expression of alpha (1)- and beta (2)-adrenoceptors, and p75 neurotrophin receptors in rats with steroid-induced polycystic ovaries. Reprod Biol Endocrinol 2005; 3: 21. [DOI:10.1186/1477-7827-3-21]
38. Kaufman JM, Kesner JS, Wilson RC, Knobil E. Electrophysiological manifestation of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone pulse generator activity in the rhesus monkey: influence of -adrenergic and dopaminergic blocking agents. Endocrinology 1985; 116: 1327-1333. [DOI:10.1210/endo-116-4-1327]
39. Bernuci MP, Szawka RE, Helena CVV, Leite CM, Lara HE, Anselmo-Franci JA. Locus Coeruleus Mediates Cold Stress-Induced Polycystic Ovary in Rats. Endocrinology 2008; 149: 2907-2916. [DOI:10.1210/en.2007-1254]

Add your comments about this article : Your username or Email:
CAPTCHA code

Send email to the article author


© 2018 All Rights Reserved | International Journal of Reproductive BioMedicine

Designed & Developed by : Yektaweb